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Lurking, willing to answer JRuby questions

Lurking, willing to answer JRuby questions

From:
Charles Oliver Nutter
Date:
2012-01-05 @ 01:24
Hi all! I'm interested in seeing Brown Shoes move forward, and while I
don't really have time myself to help, I'm willing to answer questions
and point you toward others who can help more.

I know one question that's come up is whether to use SWT or Swing. I
don't have a strong opinion, nor am I an expert on either, but I'll
enumerate some key benefits of each.

SWT:

PRO:
* Native-looking widgets
* Native-feeling UX...even on more limited systems
* Additional native platform integration (system tray, unusual UI elements, etc)

CON:
* Requires shipping appropriate native bindings for each platform

Swing:

PRO:
* Built into any full JDK
* Works across a wider range of platforms (though both support the
"key" platforms well)
* No need to ship any additional native libraries
* Pluggable L&F with native-looking by default

CON:
* Sometimes sluggish, especially if you don't know what you're doing
* Native L&F often differ in annoying ways form real native
* Bigger in memory?

There are lots of successful apps using both toolkits: Eclipse is the
obvious one for SWT, but also the Redcar text editor (written in Ruby
wrapping SWT...see the "swt" gem for a few shortcuts). On the Swing
side there's other IDEs like NetBeans and IntelliJ.

That's all I have for now :)

- Charlie

Re: [shoes] Lurking, willing to answer JRuby questions

From:
Steve Klabnik
Date:
2012-01-05 @ 03:31
Good to have you, Charlie.

One of the best features of shoes is packaging; with the native stuff,
you get a .exe, .app, or .run file, with a Ruby, all the libraries,
and everything. Rawr would help out with that, right? Is one or the
other easier in that regard?

-Steve

Re: [shoes] Lurking, willing to answer JRuby questions

From:
Cecil Coupe
Date:
2012-01-05 @ 05:27
FWIW, Vuze or Azerus http://www.vuze.com/ is a multi platform java app
that uses SWT. I do remember a hitch in the get along when installing on
my linux box several years ago (su stuff, apt-get swt ?) It updates it's
jar when new versions are available (spooky that) and worked during all
the wacky sun/oracle/openjdk/ubuntu thrashing. It's seriously heavy in
MVC GUI but it's impressive for a Java app (after it gets running)

On Wed, 2012-01-04 at 22:31 -0500, Steve Klabnik wrote:
> Good to have you, Charlie.
> 
> One of the best features of shoes is packaging; with the native stuff,
> you get a .exe, .app, or .run file, with a Ruby, all the libraries,
> and everything. Rawr would help out with that, right? Is one or the
> other easier in that regard?
> 
> -Steve

Re: [shoes] Lurking, willing to answer JRuby questions

From:
Tobias Pfeiffer
Date:
2012-01-05 @ 13:11
Hey, thanks for the input!

JRuby is awesome and imo very easy to get started with (I had an 
integration exercise with JRuby in the mendicant core skills course).

I found the following guide really helpful: 
https://github.com/jruby/jruby/wiki/CallingJavaFromJRuby - so I f you 
want to see how to interact with Java from JRuby this is a good place to 
get started.

One of my favorites is that you can call Java getters/setters as if they 
were Ruby setters/getters. And you can use snake_case instead of CamelCase.

Well thanks to the JRuby team - just my 2 cents,
Tobi

On 01/05/2012 02:24 AM, Charles Oliver Nutter wrote:
> Hi all! I'm interested in seeing Brown Shoes move forward, and while I
> don't really have time myself to help, I'm willing to answer questions
> and point you toward others who can help more.
>
> I know one question that's come up is whether to use SWT or Swing. I
> don't have a strong opinion, nor am I an expert on either, but I'll
> enumerate some key benefits of each.
>
> SWT:
>
> PRO:
> * Native-looking widgets
> * Native-feeling UX...even on more limited systems
> * Additional native platform integration (system tray, unusual UI elements, etc)
>
> CON:
> * Requires shipping appropriate native bindings for each platform
>
> Swing:
>
> PRO:
> * Built into any full JDK
> * Works across a wider range of platforms (though both support the
> "key" platforms well)
> * No need to ship any additional native libraries
> * Pluggable L&F with native-looking by default
>
> CON:
> * Sometimes sluggish, especially if you don't know what you're doing
> * Native L&F often differ in annoying ways form real native
> * Bigger in memory?
>
> There are lots of successful apps using both toolkits: Eclipse is the
> obvious one for SWT, but also the Redcar text editor (written in Ruby
> wrapping SWT...see the "swt" gem for a few shortcuts). On the Swing
> side there's other IDEs like NetBeans and IntelliJ.
>
> That's all I have for now :)
>
> - Charlie