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Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
David Lucia
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 14:33
I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
that its a web app makes it very accessible.

Could hackety hack be more like this one day?

-- 
Dave Lucia
Watson Peer Advisor
Binghamton University

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Evan Farrar
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 14:50
More like this in what way? Try Ruby's lessons are already integrated
with hackety hack.

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 9:33 AM, David Lucia <dlucia1@binghamton.edu> wrote:
> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
>
> --
> Dave Lucia
> Watson Peer Advisor
> Binghamton University
>

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
David Lucia
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 14:56
It would be nice for hackety hack to be entirely a web app, instead of a
desktop app. This would make it easier for newcomers to immediately jump
right in, because I know that people get turned off by having to run an
executable and what not.


Just a thought..

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 10:50 AM, Evan Farrar <evanfarrar@gmail.com> wrote:

> More like this in what way? Try Ruby's lessons are already integrated
> with hackety hack.
>
> On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 9:33 AM, David Lucia <dlucia1@binghamton.edu>
> wrote:
> > I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an
> educational website
> > modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the
> fact
> > that its a web app makes it very accessible.
> > Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
> >
> > --
> > Dave Lucia
> > Watson Peer Advisor
> > Binghamton University
> >
>



-- 
Dave Lucia
Watson Peer Advisor
Binghamton Universityl

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Steve Klabnik
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 15:07
Ah, you beat me to it.

I'm not going to say that it's not possible, but it would require a total,
100% re-write of all of the code. Unless someone specifically wants to work
on such a thing, I can't really think it'd be in the cards any time soon...

I think it also depends on who you talk to. I mean, I love web apps. 90% of
my programming is web apps. But some people also are really turned off by
web apps...

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 10:56 AM, David Lucia <dlucia1@binghamton.edu>wrote:

> It would be nice for hackety hack to be entirely a web app, instead of a
> desktop app. This would make it easier for newcomers to immediately jump
> right in, because I know that people get turned off by having to run an
> executable and what not.
>
>
> Just a thought..
>
>
>

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
David Lucia
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 15:13
Eh, like I said ..just a thought.

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 11:07 AM, Steve Klabnik <steve@steveklabnik.com>wrote:

> Ah, you beat me to it.
>
> I'm not going to say that it's not possible, but it would require a total,
> 100% re-write of all of the code. Unless someone specifically wants to work
> on such a thing, I can't really think it'd be in the cards any time soon...
>
> I think it also depends on who you talk to. I mean, I love web apps. 90% of
> my programming is web apps. But some people also are really turned off by
> web apps...
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 10:56 AM, David Lucia <dlucia1@binghamton.edu>wrote:
>
>> It would be nice for hackety hack to be entirely a web app, instead of a
>> desktop app. This would make it easier for newcomers to immediately jump
>> right in, because I know that people get turned off by having to run an
>> executable and what not.
>>
>>
>> Just a thought..
>>
>>
>>


-- 
Dave Lucia
Watson Peer Advisor
Binghamton University

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Steve Klabnik
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 15:17
Totally. And like I said, I'm open to it... but I don't want to do a total
re-write right now...

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Steve Klabnik
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 15:04
Hey Dave-

I'm not sure _exactly_ what you're asking. We already have Try Ruby, and a
very similar tutorial is built into Hackety Hack... do you mean using
Hackety to develop web applications?

-Steve

On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 10:33 AM, David Lucia <dlucia1@binghamton.edu>wrote:

> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
>
> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
>
> --
> Dave Lucia
> Watson Peer Advisor
> Binghamton University
>

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Fela Winkelmolen
Date:
2010-07-21 @ 15:21
> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
> 
> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?

You are aware of tryruby.org right? :)

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Jenna Fox
Date:
2010-07-22 @ 00:12
Also, I believe Magnus of Camping is working on something kind of like 
that.. a little web programming doodad where you can write ruby and run it
right in your web browser, making little ruby webapps right there. His 
idea uses jRuby in an applet to run the app locally, though I'm hoping we 
can convince an educational institution or failing that, a business, to 
donate a server to our educating kids cause, and set up a little camping 
hosting provider as well. Something where you could make a little camping 
webapp and upload it with a command line thing or a button in judofyr's 
thing, and have it appear in a gallery of apps on Camping's website, 
almost like the shoebox. Free hosting of little thingies - because kids 
don't have money for hosting - a cheap shared hosting plan cuts their 
candy money down by one quarter (!), and that's just not sensible 
monetarily!

I'm currently writing a little toy key/value database in pure ruby, trying
to make it as simple as possible while being fast and just using files, 
like sqlite does. It's coming along well and should fill the database 
needs of such hosting. I rather like the idea of there being a 
campers-toolkit gem, which brings along lots of little toys like that. 
Maybe we should have a Gem which provides a simple UI on top of Markaby, 
abstracting away html, javascript, and css, so beginners can create a 
webpage more like they can with Shoes in Hackety. When it comes right down
to it, I don't see it as being impossible that we could go down that 
rabbit hole as far as hacking in to the ruby 1.9 bytecode for that whole 
'view' section of code, and run it on the client inside of a javascript 
interpreter. Javascript is so crazy fast these days that the 
inefficiencies of doing something like that would still probably result in
ruby code running about as fast as on the server. :P

If you're interested in the webappy side of this, definitely get yourself 
involved with camping.


On 22/07/2010, at 1:21 AM, Fela Winkelmolen wrote:

>> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
>> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
>> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
>> 
>> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
> 
> You are aware of tryruby.org right? :)

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Devyn Cairns
Date:
2010-07-22 @ 18:26
On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 5:12 PM, Jenna Fox <a@creativepony.com> wrote:

> Also, I believe Magnus of Camping is working on something kind of like
> that.. a little web programming doodad where you can write ruby and run it
> right in your web browser, making little ruby webapps right there. His idea
> uses jRuby in an applet to run the app locally, though I'm hoping we can
> convince an educational institution or failing that, a business, to donate a
> server to our educating kids cause, and set up a little camping hosting
> provider as well. Something where you could make a little camping webapp and
> upload it with a command line thing or a button in judofyr's thing, and have
> it appear in a gallery of apps on Camping's website, almost like the
> shoebox. Free hosting of little thingies - because kids don't have money for
> hosting - a cheap shared hosting plan cuts their candy money down by one
> quarter (!), and that's just not sensible monetarily!
>

This could easily be done on Heroku, Camping is supported. For purposes like
these, they'll often help you out.


> I'm currently writing a little toy key/value database in pure ruby, trying
> to make it as simple as possible while being fast and just using files, like
> sqlite does. It's coming along well and should fill the database needs of
> such hosting. I rather like the idea of there being a campers-toolkit gem,
> which brings along lots of little toys like that. Maybe we should have a Gem
> which provides a simple UI on top of Markaby, abstracting away html,
> javascript, and css, so beginners can create a webpage more like they can
> with Shoes in Hackety. When it comes right down to it, I don't see it as
> being impossible that we could go down that rabbit hole as far as hacking in
> to the ruby 1.9 bytecode for that whole 'view' section of code, and run it
> on the client inside of a javascript interpreter. Javascript is so crazy
> fast these days that the inefficiencies of doing something like that would
> still probably result in ruby code running about as fast as on the server.
> :P
>

And, that couldn't be done on Heroku :( So, I don't know. Sounds like a good
idea.


>
> If you're interested in the webappy side of this, definitely get yourself
> involved with camping.
>
>
> On 22/07/2010, at 1:21 AM, Fela Winkelmolen wrote:
>
> >> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational
> website
> >> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the
> fact
> >> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
> >>
> >> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
> >
> > You are aware of tryruby.org right? :)
>
>


-- 
    ~devyn

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Jenna Fox
Date:
2010-07-22 @ 23:37
Devyn: I am aware of heroku, but consider it's free app hosting to be far 
too arbitrarily limiting, particularly in the single-process and no write 
access to filesystem aspects. I don't think kids should be forced to live 
off the scraps of capitalism. I don't think we should be partnering with 
Heroku in any way that essentially grooms these kids to be future 
customers. Heroku is far too performance oriented at the cost of being 
less hackable and fun. I feel it goes against the tradition of ruby in 
this regard.


On 23/07/2010, at 4:26 AM, Devyn Cairns wrote:

> 
> 
> On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 5:12 PM, Jenna Fox <a@creativepony.com> wrote:
> Also, I believe Magnus of Camping is working on something kind of like 
that.. a little web programming doodad where you can write ruby and run it
right in your web browser, making little ruby webapps right there. His 
idea uses jRuby in an applet to run the app locally, though I'm hoping we 
can convince an educational institution or failing that, a business, to 
donate a server to our educating kids cause, and set up a little camping 
hosting provider as well. Something where you could make a little camping 
webapp and upload it with a command line thing or a button in judofyr's 
thing, and have it appear in a gallery of apps on Camping's website, 
almost like the shoebox. Free hosting of little thingies - because kids 
don't have money for hosting - a cheap shared hosting plan cuts their 
candy money down by one quarter (!), and that's just not sensible 
monetarily!
> 
> This could easily be done on Heroku, Camping is supported. For purposes 
like these, they'll often help you out.
> 
> 
> I'm currently writing a little toy key/value database in pure ruby, 
trying to make it as simple as possible while being fast and just using 
files, like sqlite does. It's coming along well and should fill the 
database needs of such hosting. I rather like the idea of there being a 
campers-toolkit gem, which brings along lots of little toys like that. 
Maybe we should have a Gem which provides a simple UI on top of Markaby, 
abstracting away html, javascript, and css, so beginners can create a 
webpage more like they can with Shoes in Hackety. When it comes right down
to it, I don't see it as being impossible that we could go down that 
rabbit hole as far as hacking in to the ruby 1.9 bytecode for that whole 
'view' section of code, and run it on the client inside of a javascript 
interpreter. Javascript is so crazy fast these days that the 
inefficiencies of doing something like that would still probably result in
ruby code running about as fast as on the server. :P
> 
> And, that couldn't be done on Heroku :( So, I don't know. Sounds like a 
good idea.
>  
> 
> If you're interested in the webappy side of this, definitely get 
yourself involved with camping.
> 
> 
> On 22/07/2010, at 1:21 AM, Fela Winkelmolen wrote:
> 
> >> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational website
> >> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the fact
> >> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
> >>
> >> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
> >
> > You are aware of tryruby.org right? :)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
>     ~devyn

Re: [hacketyhack] Another Learning Site Geared towards Haskell

From:
Devyn Cairns
Date:
2010-07-23 @ 18:30
On Thu, Jul 22, 2010 at 4:37 PM, Jenna Fox <a@creativepony.com> wrote:

> Devyn: I am aware of heroku, but consider it's free app hosting to be far
> too arbitrarily limiting, particularly in the single-process and no write
> access to filesystem aspects.
>

Yes, its free app hosting is rather limited. But when we were developing the
Shoes website, they told us that if there was anything we needed (extra DB
space, workers, whatever) they'd try to get it to us.

No write access would be a problem for using your own database, yes.

I don't think kids should be forced to live off the scraps of capitalism. I
> don't think we should be partnering with Heroku in any way that essentially
> grooms these kids to be future customers. Heroku is far too performance
> oriented at the cost of being less hackable and fun. I feel it goes against
> the tradition of ruby in this regard.
>

Yes, I suppose you're right.


>
>
>
> On 23/07/2010, at 4:26 AM, Devyn Cairns wrote:
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 5:12 PM, Jenna Fox <a@creativepony.com> wrote:
>
> Also, I believe Magnus of Camping is working on something kind of like
> that.. a little web programming doodad where you can write ruby and run it
> right in your web browser, making little ruby webapps right there. His idea
> uses jRuby in an applet to run the app locally, though I'm hoping we can
> convince an educational institution or failing that, a business, to donate a
> server to our educating kids cause, and set up a little camping hosting
> provider as well. Something where you could make a little camping webapp and
> upload it with a command line thing or a button in judofyr's thing, and have
> it appear in a gallery of apps on Camping's website, almost like the
> shoebox. Free hosting of little thingies - because kids don't have money for
> hosting - a cheap shared hosting plan cuts their candy money down by one
> quarter (!), and that's just not sensible monetarily!
>
>
> This could easily be done on Heroku, Camping is supported. For purposes
> like these, they'll often help you out.
>
>
>> I'm currently writing a little toy key/value database in pure ruby, trying
>> to make it as simple as possible while being fast and just using files, like
>> sqlite does. It's coming along well and should fill the database needs of
>> such hosting. I rather like the idea of there being a campers-toolkit gem,
>> which brings along lots of little toys like that. Maybe we should have a Gem
>> which provides a simple UI on top of Markaby, abstracting away html,
>> javascript, and css, so beginners can create a webpage more like they can
>> with Shoes in Hackety. When it comes right down to it, I don't see it as
>> being impossible that we could go down that rabbit hole as far as hacking in
>> to the ruby 1.9 bytecode for that whole 'view' section of code, and run it
>> on the client inside of a javascript interpreter. Javascript is so crazy
>> fast these days that the inefficiencies of doing something like that would
>> still probably result in ruby code running about as fast as on the server.
>> :P
>>
>
> And, that couldn't be done on Heroku :( So, I don't know. Sounds like a
> good idea.
>
>
>>
>> If you're interested in the webappy side of this, definitely get yourself
>> involved with camping.
>>
>>
>> On 22/07/2010, at 1:21 AM, Fela Winkelmolen wrote:
>>
>> >> I just came across http://tryhaskell.org/, which is an educational
>> website
>> >> modeled after Try Ruby. I like how simple their interface is, and the
>> fact
>> >> that its a web app makes it very accessible.
>> >>
>> >> Could hackety hack be more like this one day?
>> >
>> > You are aware of tryruby.org right? :)
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>     ~devyn
>
>
>


-- 
    ~devyn