librelist archives

« back to archive

Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jean Menezes da Rocha
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 20:00
Hello guys,

I am trying to create a site with a rather simple structure, but I think
I did not get exactly how to implement it.

Basically, I need my site to be divided into periodical issues, with the
current issue's TOC showing up at the front page.

I am thinking of using a directory called "issues", with each new issue
creating its own "issues/<issue_number>". Inside each issue, I should
have its respective articles.

How can I make my app look for the newest issue and show its TOC on the
front page?

I think that if you help me to do this first step, I may be able to
figure everything else out.

Thanks in advance, and best regards!

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Steven Kryskalla
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 20:32
On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 12:00 PM, Jean Menezes da Rocha
<jean.rudess@gmail.com> wrote:
> How can I make my app look for the newest issue and show its TOC on the
> front page?

How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
they in? Do you want to store them in a database? Inside a file on
disk? You need to decide on how to model the data before you can build
a web app for it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jean Menezes da Rocha
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 20:50
Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:

> How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
> they in? Do you want to store them in a database? Inside a file on
> disk? You need to decide on how to model the data before you can build
> a web app for it.
> 

I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Steven Kryskalla
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 22:01
On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 12:50 PM, Jean Menezes da Rocha
<jean.rudess@gmail.com> wrote:
> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.

Ok, that's a fine choice to store them in files. What format are the
issues in? JSON? HTML? XML? PDF?

You need a way to list the issues, find the release date / publish
date for each issue, get the table of contents for an issue, and get
the full content of an issue, e.g. these 4 python functions:

def get_issues(): ...returns a list of the issues on disk...
def get_release_date(issue): ...return a date...
def get_table_of_contents(issue): ...parses the file on disk and
returns the table of contents as a dict, or some HTML, etc..
def get_content(issue): ...parses the file on disk and returns the
content of the issue as a dict, or HTML, etc...

The implementation of those four functions depends on how you're
storing the data. Once you have those functions, then hook them up to
your flask app using the routes you described. The index page will get
the list of issues and their release dates, sort them by release date,
find the latest one, grab the table of contents for it, and display
it. The "/issues/<issue_number>" pages will just look up the contents
for the given issue and display it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jean Menezes da Rocha
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 22:28
Em 12-12-2012 20:01, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:

> Ok, that's a fine choice to store them in files. What format are the
> issues in? JSON? HTML? XML? PDF?

First of all, thanks for the quick response.
As this journal is to be exclusively for online reading, I am willing to
store articles as markdown files, under its respective issue directory
(yes, issues should be directories, not files). This way, articles would
behave like regular blog posts, but grouped under folders corresponding
the issue they belong to.

> 
> The implementation of those four functions depends on how you're
> storing the data. Once you have those functions, then hook them up to
> your flask app using the routes you described. The index page will get
> the list of issues and their release dates, sort them by release date,
> find the latest one, grab the table of contents for it, and display
> it. The "/issues/<issue_number>" pages will just look up the contents
> for the given issue and display it.
> 

Based upon my aforementioned choice on storing issues as folders and
articles as files, I am still not sure about how to retrieve this data
and get a listing of such directories as a Table of Contents.

Do you have any better suggestions for storage, or in case my structure
is fit, do you have any further considerations on implementation?

Thanks in advance.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Andy D'Arcy Jewell
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 00:16
On 12/12/12 22:28, Jean Menezes da Rocha wrote:
> Do you have any better suggestions for storage, or in case my 
> structure is fit, do you have any further considerations on 
> implementation? Thanks in advance. 
You might find that a key-value store (or "document oriented database") 
like CouchDB, Hyperdex or Cassandra may be a better fit than a 
file-system or a SQL database system.

However, it would be a good idea to start with what you already know, 
and then explore the alternatives to see which fits best. If you're a 
beginner, and aren't sure, work through the Flask tutorial, and use that 
as a "skeleton" for a SQL-based approach, then try re-implementing as a 
file-system and so on until you can decide which approach is best for 
your app.

One of the great things about Flask is it makes this approach quite easy 
because it doesn't impose any specific type of solution on you (like 
some frameworks do), and if you abstract all your data access code into 
functions, you shouldn't have too much to change to convert from one DB 
backend to another.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jean Menezes da Rocha
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 00:52
Nathan and Andy,

you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
very opposite direction.
Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
database (any of them)?

I appreciate your help very much.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Martín Blech
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 01:07
If you would like to stick with the directories+markdown files structure,
Jekyll <http://jekyllrb.com/> is definitely worth having a look at. Of
course it's doable with Flask as well, but as others have stated before,
you will probably need to deal with databases.


On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 9:52 PM, Jean Menezes da Rocha <
jean.rudess@gmail.com> wrote:

> Nathan and Andy,
>
> you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
> Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
> avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
> very opposite direction.
> Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
> database (any of them)?
>
> I appreciate your help very much.
>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Andy D'Arcy Jewell
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 08:41
On 13/12/12 00:52, Jean Menezes da Rocha wrote:
> Nathan and Andy,
>
> you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
> Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
> avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
> very opposite direction.
> Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
> database (any of them)?
>
> I appreciate your help very much.
>
The tutorial app on the Flask web site *IS* a very simple web-log. It 
doesn't take long to work through (depending on your experience - make 
sure you understand each bit properly before moving on tho):

http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/tutorial/

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jesaja Everling
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 09:55
Maybe this is also of interest:

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/write-a-tumblelog-application-with-flask-mongoengine/

On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 9:41 AM, Andy D'Arcy Jewell
<andy@wild-flower.co.uk> wrote:
> On 13/12/12 00:52, Jean Menezes da Rocha wrote:
>> Nathan and Andy,
>>
>> you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
>> Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
>> avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
>> very opposite direction.
>> Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
>> database (any of them)?
>>
>> I appreciate your help very much.
>>
> The tutorial app on the Flask web site *IS* a very simple web-log. It
> doesn't take long to work through (depending on your experience - make
> sure you understand each bit properly before moving on tho):
>
> http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/tutorial/

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Nathan M
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 05:47
The flask tutorial was ok as I remember, I'll search others later.
Depending on how fluent you are with python, you may wish to work through
multiple tutorials ? There's also the demo app on github, read the sources,
that will help you a lot.

Welcome in flask land, it's a great place :-)
On Dec 13, 2012 1:58 AM, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Nathan and Andy,
>
> you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
> Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
> avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
> very opposite direction.
> Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
> database (any of them)?
>
> I appreciate your help very much.
>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Sina K
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 08:23
For pure python, I really enjoyed http://www.codecademy.com - It starts 
pretty basic and goes through Python quite well
> Nathan M <mailto:feydaykyn@gmail.com>
> December 13, 2012 6:47 AM
>
> The flask tutorial was ok as I remember, I'll search others later. 
> Depending on how fluent you are with python, you may wish to work 
> through multiple tutorials ? There's also the demo app on github, read 
> the sources, that will help you a lot.
>
> Welcome in flask land, it's a great place :-)
>
> Jean Menezes da Rocha <mailto:jean.rudess@gmail.com>
> December 13, 2012 1:52 AM
> Nathan and Andy,
>
> you are right: I have little experience with programming for web with
> Python. I thought it would be easier to deal only with flat files and
> avoid dealing with databases. However, your responses are indicating the
> very opposite direction.
> Can you recommend some nice tutorial on creating weblogs using Flask +
> database (any of them)?
>
> I appreciate your help very much.
>
> Andy D'Arcy Jewell <mailto:andy@wild-flower.co.uk>
> December 13, 2012 1:16 AM
> You might find that a key-value store (or "document oriented database")
> like CouchDB, Hyperdex or Cassandra may be a better fit than a
> file-system or a SQL database system.
>
> However, it would be a good idea to start with what you already know,
> and then explore the alternatives to see which fits best. If you're a
> beginner, and aren't sure, work through the Flask tutorial, and use that
> as a "skeleton" for a SQL-based approach, then try re-implementing as a
> file-system and so on until you can decide which approach is best for
> your app.
>
> One of the great things about Flask is it makes this approach quite easy
> because it doesn't impose any specific type of solution on you (like
> some frameworks do), and if you abstract all your data access code into
> functions, you shouldn't have too much to change to convert from one DB
> backend to another.
>
> Jean Menezes da Rocha <mailto:jean.rudess@gmail.com>
> December 12, 2012 11:28 PM
> Em 12-12-2012 20:01, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
>
>> Ok, that's a fine choice to store them in files. What format are the
>> issues in? JSON? HTML? XML? PDF?
>
> First of all, thanks for the quick response.
> As this journal is to be exclusively for online reading, I am willing to
> store articles as markdown files, under its respective issue directory
> (yes, issues should be directories, not files). This way, articles would
> behave like regular blog posts, but grouped under folders corresponding
> the issue they belong to.
>
>> The implementation of those four functions depends on how you're
>> storing the data. Once you have those functions, then hook them up to
>> your flask app using the routes you described. The index page will get
>> the list of issues and their release dates, sort them by release date,
>> find the latest one, grab the table of contents for it, and display
>> it. The "/issues/<issue_number>" pages will just look up the contents
>> for the given issue and display it.
>>
>
> Based upon my aforementioned choice on storing issues as folders and
> articles as files, I am still not sure about how to retrieve this data
> and get a listing of such directories as a Table of Contents.
>
> Do you have any better suggestions for storage, or in case my structure
> is fit, do you have any further considerations on implementation?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Steven Kryskalla <mailto:skryskalla@gmail.com>
> December 12, 2012 11:01 PM
> On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 12:50 PM, Jean Menezes da Rocha
>
> Ok, that's a fine choice to store them in files. What format are the
> issues in? JSON? HTML? XML? PDF?
>
> You need a way to list the issues, find the release date / publish
> date for each issue, get the table of contents for an issue, and get
> the full content of an issue, e.g. these 4 python functions:
>
> def get_issues(): ...returns a list of the issues on disk...
> def get_release_date(issue): ...return a date...
> def get_table_of_contents(issue): ...parses the file on disk and
> returns the table of contents as a dict, or some HTML, etc..
> def get_content(issue): ...parses the file on disk and returns the
> content of the issue as a dict, or HTML, etc...
>
> The implementation of those four functions depends on how you're
> storing the data. Once you have those functions, then hook them up to
> your flask app using the routes you described. The index page will get
> the list of issues and their release dates, sort them by release date,
> find the latest one, grab the table of contents for it, and display
> it. The "/issues/<issue_number>" pages will just look up the contents
> for the given issue and display it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Nathan M
Date:
2012-12-12 @ 23:32
Hi,


From your questions I gather you are a beginner, and my best advice is for
you to follow a flask based blog creation tutorial. Then, redo the tutorial
with a file-based organization, and compare by yourself which one you fill
better with. By then, you will be able to create your site with more ease,
and the questions you are asking now will be clearer.
I may add my best programming tip : strive to be DRY (Do Not Repeat
Yourself).

By the way, I think you will be better off with a database, for its
flexibility and power are vastly superior to any file system organization.
It seems to you the latter will be easier because you think as a human and
not as the computer you are programming, but in fact it will soon be a mess
because you won't have any way to enforce consistency; sooner or later
discrepencies will creep in.

For instance, think about the moment you will have to update all files
because of a variable name change of whatever. What are the odds you will
forget a few and crash your app ? A db will allow you to do that easily,
and as you gain experience I think you'll be glad to have followed this
path.

--
/*
** "What do you despise? By this you are truly known."
**	from Manual of Muad'Dib by the Princess Irulan.
*/




On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 11:28 PM, Jean Menezes da Rocha <
jean.rudess@gmail.com> wrote:

> Em 12-12-2012 20:01, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
>
> > Ok, that's a fine choice to store them in files. What format are the
> > issues in? JSON? HTML? XML? PDF?
>
> First of all, thanks for the quick response.
> As this journal is to be exclusively for online reading, I am willing to
> store articles as markdown files, under its respective issue directory
> (yes, issues should be directories, not files). This way, articles would
> behave like regular blog posts, but grouped under folders corresponding
> the issue they belong to.
>
> >
> > The implementation of those four functions depends on how you're
> > storing the data. Once you have those functions, then hook them up to
> > your flask app using the routes you described. The index page will get
> > the list of issues and their release dates, sort them by release date,
> > find the latest one, grab the table of contents for it, and display
> > it. The "/issues/<issue_number>" pages will just look up the contents
> > for the given issue and display it.
> >
>
> Based upon my aforementioned choice on storing issues as folders and
> articles as files, I am still not sure about how to retrieve this data
> and get a listing of such directories as a Table of Contents.
>
> Do you have any better suggestions for storage, or in case my structure
> is fit, do you have any further considerations on implementation?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Igor TAmara
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 11:54
El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
escribió:

Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:


> How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
> they in? Do you want to ...
I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Igor TAmara
Date:
2012-12-13 @ 11:54
D

El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
escribió:

Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:


> How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
> they in? Do you want to ...
I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Robert Mela
Date:
2012-12-19 @ 19:01
If the contact is static, the updates are few (measured in dozens per
week), and there's no need for permissioning systems or secure access, then
you could do well with a static site generation system, and it would be
easy to host the results anywhere.

A filesystem is a database.    Depending on how much flexibility you need
wrt pathways for accessing a particular node of content, a filesystem could
be sufficient, at least for the maintenance side.   If scripts are used to
generate the live site, then there's a lot more flexibility in generating
alternate access paths from one node to another.

Github is using nanoc on markdown documents (
github.com/github/developer.github.com,
github.com/github/learn.github.com) for their documentation.

You could google "restructuredtext static site" and similar.    There's a
discussion at stackoverflow on restructuredtext vs markdown.

Armin Ronacher's lucumr is statically generated (
https://github.com/mitsuhiko/lucumr ).  You could start by modifying that
and seeing if it's sufficient.







On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 6:54 AM, Igor TAmara <igor@tamarapatino.org> wrote:

> D
>
> El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
> escribió:
>
>
> Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
>
>
> > How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
> > they in? Do you want to ...
>
> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.
>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Robert Mela
Date:
2012-12-20 @ 13:21
Quick follow up ( relevant to the question though not to Flask )

The static site generation tool commonly used ( though not required ) for
static github pages is "jekyll" ( https://github.com/mojombo/jekyll and
http://mojombo.github.com/jekyll/ ).




On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 2:01 PM, Robert Mela
<robert.steven.mela@gmail.com>wrote:

> If the contact is static, the updates are few (measured in dozens per
> week), and there's no need for permissioning systems or secure access, then
> you could do well with a static site generation system, and it would be
> easy to host the results anywhere.
>
> A filesystem is a database.    Depending on how much flexibility you need
> wrt pathways for accessing a particular node of content, a filesystem could
> be sufficient, at least for the maintenance side.   If scripts are used to
> generate the live site, then there's a lot more flexibility in generating
> alternate access paths from one node to another.
>
> Github is using nanoc on markdown documents (
> github.com/github/developer.github.com, 
github.com/github/learn.github.com) for their documentation.
>
> You could google "restructuredtext static site" and similar.    There's a
> discussion at stackoverflow on restructuredtext vs markdown.
>
> Armin Ronacher's lucumr is statically generated (
> https://github.com/mitsuhiko/lucumr ).  You could start by modifying that
> and seeing if it's sufficient.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 6:54 AM, Igor TAmara <igor@tamarapatino.org>wrote:
>
>> D
>>
>> El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
>> escribió:
>>
>>
>> Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
>>
>>
>> > How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
>> > they in? Do you want to ...
>>
>> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
>> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
>> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.
>>
>>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Jesaja Everling
Date:
2012-12-20 @ 13:34
If you want to use Flask, this may be useful:

http://packages.python.org/Frozen-Flask/

Best Regards,

Jesaja Everling

On Thu, Dec 20, 2012 at 2:21 PM, Robert Mela
<robert.steven.mela@gmail.com> wrote:
> Quick follow up ( relevant to the question though not to Flask )
>
> The static site generation tool commonly used ( though not required ) for
> static github pages is "jekyll" ( https://github.com/mojombo/jekyll and
> http://mojombo.github.com/jekyll/ ).
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 2:01 PM, Robert Mela <robert.steven.mela@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> If the contact is static, the updates are few (measured in dozens per
>> week), and there's no need for permissioning systems or secure access, then
>> you could do well with a static site generation system, and it would be easy
>> to host the results anywhere.
>>
>> A filesystem is a database.    Depending on how much flexibility you need
>> wrt pathways for accessing a particular node of content, a filesystem could
>> be sufficient, at least for the maintenance side.   If scripts are used to
>> generate the live site, then there's a lot more flexibility in generating
>> alternate access paths from one node to another.
>>
>> Github is using nanoc on markdown documents (
>> github.com/github/developer.github.com, github.com/github/learn.github.com )
>> for their documentation.
>>
>> You could google "restructuredtext static site" and similar.    There's a
>> discussion at stackoverflow on restructuredtext vs markdown.
>>
>> Armin Ronacher's lucumr is statically generated (
>> https://github.com/mitsuhiko/lucumr ).  You could start by modifying that
>> and seeing if it's sufficient.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 6:54 AM, Igor TAmara <igor@tamarapatino.org>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> D
>>>
>>> El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
>>> escribió:
>>>
>>>
>>> Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
>>>
>>>
>>> > How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format are
>>> > they in? Do you want to ...
>>>
>>> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
>>> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
>>> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.
>>
>>
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Dustin Chapman
Date:
2012-12-20 @ 14:13
Another Flask-based project you could use for static page generation is
Blohg [1], which also utilizes Mercurial VCS and ReStructured Text. To use
it more as a CMS, see the specific doc page [2].

[1] http://blohg.org/
[2] http://docs.blohg.org/en/0.11.1/new-blog/#using-blohg-as-a-cms

-- Dustin
On Dec 20, 2012 8:35 AM, "Jesaja Everling" <jeverling@gmail.com> wrote:

> If you want to use Flask, this may be useful:
>
> http://packages.python.org/Frozen-Flask/
>
> Best Regards,
>
> Jesaja Everling
>
> On Thu, Dec 20, 2012 at 2:21 PM, Robert Mela
> <robert.steven.mela@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Quick follow up ( relevant to the question though not to Flask )
> >
> > The static site generation tool commonly used ( though not required ) for
> > static github pages is "jekyll" ( https://github.com/mojombo/jekyll and
> > http://mojombo.github.com/jekyll/ ).
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 2:01 PM, Robert Mela <
> robert.steven.mela@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> If the contact is static, the updates are few (measured in dozens per
> >> week), and there's no need for permissioning systems or secure access,
> then
> >> you could do well with a static site generation system, and it would be
> easy
> >> to host the results anywhere.
> >>
> >> A filesystem is a database.    Depending on how much flexibility you
> need
> >> wrt pathways for accessing a particular node of content, a filesystem
> could
> >> be sufficient, at least for the maintenance side.   If scripts are used
> to
> >> generate the live site, then there's a lot more flexibility in
> generating
> >> alternate access paths from one node to another.
> >>
> >> Github is using nanoc on markdown documents (
> >> github.com/github/developer.github.com,
> github.com/github/learn.github.com )
> >> for their documentation.
> >>
> >> You could google "restructuredtext static site" and similar.    There's
> a
> >> discussion at stackoverflow on restructuredtext vs markdown.
> >>
> >> Armin Ronacher's lucumr is statically generated (
> >> https://github.com/mitsuhiko/lucumr ).  You could start by modifying
> that
> >> and seeing if it's sufficient.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 6:54 AM, Igor TAmara <igor@tamarapatino.org>
> >> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> D
> >>>
> >>> El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
> >>> escribió:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> > How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format
> are
> >>> > they in? Do you want to ...
> >>>
> >>> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
> >>> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
> >>> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.
> >>
> >>
> >
>

Re: [flask] Help on makinp a scientific journal with Flask

From:
Todd Kennedy
Date:
2012-12-20 @ 14:32
Or you can us Cactus (http://github.com/koenbok/cactus) which is a static
site generator in python which uses the django templates (which are super
similar to jinja2).

On Dec 20, 2012, at 9:15, Dustin Chapman <dustin.r.chapman@gmail.com> wrote:

Another Flask-based project you could use for static page generation is
Blohg [1], which also utilizes Mercurial VCS and ReStructured Text. To use
it more as a CMS, see the specific doc page [2].

[1] http://blohg.org/
[2] http://docs.blohg.org/en/0.11.1/new-blog/#using-blohg-as-a-cms

-- Dustin
On Dec 20, 2012 8:35 AM, "Jesaja Everling" <jeverling@gmail.com> wrote:

> If you want to use Flask, this may be useful:
>
> http://packages.python.org/Frozen-Flask/
>
> Best Regards,
>
> Jesaja Everling
>
> On Thu, Dec 20, 2012 at 2:21 PM, Robert Mela
> <robert.steven.mela@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Quick follow up ( relevant to the question though not to Flask )
> >
> > The static site generation tool commonly used ( though not required ) for
> > static github pages is "jekyll" ( https://github.com/mojombo/jekyll and
> > http://mojombo.github.com/jekyll/ ).
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 2:01 PM, Robert Mela <
> robert.steven.mela@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> If the contact is static, the updates are few (measured in dozens per
> >> week), and there's no need for permissioning systems or secure access,
> then
> >> you could do well with a static site generation system, and it would be
> easy
> >> to host the results anywhere.
> >>
> >> A filesystem is a database.    Depending on how much flexibility you
> need
> >> wrt pathways for accessing a particular node of content, a filesystem
> could
> >> be sufficient, at least for the maintenance side.   If scripts are used
> to
> >> generate the live site, then there's a lot more flexibility in
> generating
> >> alternate access paths from one node to another.
> >>
> >> Github is using nanoc on markdown documents (
> >> github.com/github/developer.github.com,
> github.com/github/learn.github.com )
> >> for their documentation.
> >>
> >> You could google "restructuredtext static site" and similar.    There's
> a
> >> discussion at stackoverflow on restructuredtext vs markdown.
> >>
> >> Armin Ronacher's lucumr is statically generated (
> >> https://github.com/mitsuhiko/lucumr ).  You could start by modifying
> that
> >> and seeing if it's sufficient.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 6:54 AM, Igor TAmara <igor@tamarapatino.org>
> >> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> D
> >>>
> >>> El 12/12/2012 15:53, "Jean Menezes da Rocha" <jean.rudess@gmail.com>
> >>> escribió:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Em 12-12-2012 18:32, Steven Kryskalla escreveu:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> > How are you storing the issues and tables of contents? What format
> are
> >>> > they in? Do you want to ...
> >>>
> >>> I prefer not using a database. Files and folders would do, as this is a
> >>> small project. However, if you have some authoritative opinion on
> >>> whether use one or another model, I appreciate it.
> >>
> >>
> >
>